Posted on October 24, 2016

Book Art at Lumb Bank

Last night I dreamt I went to Lumb Bank again… no actually, I really did.

I was trying to photograph the sunset before it got too dark, then chatting in the kitchen with the others in the group. We were doing the dishes together, leaning over the sink, and then I looked out of the window and it had started snowing. The roads were flat instead of steep. The leaves were gone. Everything was slightly altered and different, but also the same…

Sunset at the Ted Hughes house, Lumb Bank, October 16

It’s only two weeks since I returned and it feels like a dream, like the dream I just had, but also so close and vivid in my head, like I’m squeezing it tighter and tighter for more inspiration.

Creativity in action on the Book Art course, Lumb Bank, October 16

The course I took was a mix of book art and poetry, both tutors (Rachel Hazell, travelling book-binder and Stevie Ronnie, poet and artist) working hard to ensure the two disciplines meshed perfectly.

We had been tasked with writing a short poem on our first night, inspired by the ‘poetry fortune teller’ that Stevie came up with (my ‘poetry prescription’ was to write a 7-line poem featuring the word ‘spinning top’ and the colour silver).

Poetry Fortune Teller, Book Art & Poetry, Lumb Bank, Oct16

Poetry ‘Fortune Teller’

The next morning was about making miniature books from a single piece of A4 paper, and filling them quickly with words or just the repetition of the word ‘word’ or ‘text’. I used my simple 7-line poem for some of mine:

She spun/ silver in the night,/ her hair splayed/out; skate-blades/chiseling ice/ faster than rain off a/ spinning top

Next we got our scalpels out to cut windows, doors, mouths, secret compartments and pop-ups in our paper books (best viewed from above I think). It was starting to feel a bit magical!

Book Art, Lumb Bank, October 16

On our second day of book art-ing, we got to use ‘the good paper’, and make bigger books with more detailed covers.

We spent some time using different methods of lettering and typography to decorate our paper, techniques like: stenciling, calligraphy, letraset, cut-out words or phrases from books and magazines, handwriting, painting and stamping.

It was my first time using a calligraphy pen (real name: pilot parallel pen) and it was A-MA-ZING.

Word-art for a book cover, Book Art course, Lumb Bank, Oct16

We were working quickly and I used words that had popped up in our conversations and our poetry workshop on the second morning, as well as words connected with guest speaker Amy Shelton‘s work highlighting the plight of honey bees. (It was a revelation to find out that pollen comes in so many different colours – red, blue, green, yellow – many more than I had imagined.)

Placing the words at random created new phrases based on each word’s proximity to another. I loved these new ‘concepts’ that I feel will definitely need to be exploited further:

Pollen Rabbit

Sleep Stanza

Porcelain Squirrel

Geisha Moon

Xerox Love

Kestrel Stitch

Star Geometry

Wow. So interesting. I would never have thought of these myself.

Later that afternoon I spent some time making a mini-book of my own imagining, to help reinforce the binding technique.

I used scraps of paper and cut-out shapes I’d saved in a tin from hole punches I used to have: stars, flowers, hearts and birds – I wish I still had them.

Book Art, Lumb Bank, October 16

I also experienced a big revelation while on the course: that I need to use textiles much more in my art. All my art as well as any book art!

I didn’t want to leave without incorporating some textile detail into a book I’d made, so I stitched up some tea-steam that became the ‘tea ghosts’ of Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath on the reverse. (I also wrote about visiting Sylvia Plath’s grave in nearby Heptonstall.)

Book Art, Lumb Bank, October 16

Book Art, Lumb Bank, October 16

At first I wasn’t going to invest in the tools of the book-making trade, because I wasn’t sure if making books was going to be a big thing for me, or much more than an occasional hobby. As the course progressed though I found there was something quite magical about being in that space, with that group of people, and having the opportunity to buy the tools I was using to learn with.

Book Art tools, Lumb Bank, October 16

Tools of the book-art trade: the bone-folder, the awl, the paper knife

When I saw Rachel’s stash of supplies laid out in the barn for sale, I knew I would be making more books and that I needed these tools: the bone-folder, the awl, the paper knife.

And then I had to make another book – from scratch, by myself (OK, with a little help from Rachel).

I hand-stitched ‘Wabi-Sabi’ on the front, some of it in low light on our last night so I missed a stitch, but hey, wabi-sabi.

The wool I used cost £1 from Standard Goods at Hebble End Studios in Hebden Bridge (creative capital of West Yorkshire?!)

I love the texture and the colour which matches the grey tinge of the paper. I might tie beads onto the ends of the strands I’ve used to bind the book.


Finally, part of the tradition on an Arvon retreat is to contribute to an anthology of work that everyone on the course gets a copy of to take home.

Playing to the themes of the course – and the time of year – we were tasked instead with creating a ‘leaf anthology‘ between us – our individual artistic interpretation of a leaf with words or poetry – x 17 copies!

Paper Leaves in the making of a 'Leafology', Book Art, Lumb Bank, October 16

It seemed fitting for me to use pages from my aged copy of Daphne du Maurier’s ‘Rebecca‘, and make art on the leaf: BOOK + ART.

I cut out my leaf shapes then used watercolour pencils to draw an autumn leaf.

I was surprised when everyone commented on and wanted the green one, because I thought it turned out looking more like a pineapple or a palm than a leaf

Paper Leaves in the making of a 'Leafology', Book Art, Lumb Bank, October 16

On the back of each I wrote the Japanese word KOMOREBI in gold pen, from Lost in Translation by Ella Frances Sanders (one of my favourite books):

'Leafology' inspiration, Book Art, Lumb Bank, October 16

The sunlight that filters through the leaves of the trees

I cut out little triangles to reinforce the idea of light slipping through each leaf and it felt like the perfect statement from me to my fellow book artists.

Let the sunlight filter through you. Find your unique path of light.

When we piled our leaves together, a length of gold wire at the ready so we could each construct our leaf -anthology garland when we got home, I was blown away (sorry) by how individual and intricate each leaf was. I’ve never had a leaf-anthology before and none will be as perfect as the one I’ve got.

What lovely memories I have from my week of Book Art and poetry at Lumb Bank.

Book Art, Lumb Bank, October 16

More about the poetry in another post, meanwhile check out Rachel’s post to see the garland gifted to Arvon, hanging by the fireplace.

Posted on October 17, 2016

Acorns, acorns, everywhere

In responding to a themed call-out last week via Pattern Camp for pattern designs featuring or inspired by ‘ACORNS’, I’ve become a little obsessed with them the last few days, like a squirrel scavenging, well…acorns.

ACORN, noun: the fruit of the oak, a smooth oval nut in a rough cup-like base

My first step was to create my motifs, and I chose to use ink for the first time. (If there is anything I’ve learnt about creativity, it’s that experimentation is A GOOD THING.)

I was really pleased with the results of the ink, which allowed a level of precision and intricacy which I hadn’t anticipated.

'ACORNS' surface pattern design motif in ink

I enjoyed layering up the colour, starting with a pale grey wash, building up the intensity and adding in finer details with the tip of my brush.

Turns out I love ink!

Next, I used watercolour pencils to draw some similar acorns but this time in colour.

As a final touch, I outlined them in gold pen.

Golden acorns are the best kind aren’t they?

'ACORNS' surface pattern design motif in watercolour

Both sets of acorn motifs made pretty patterns and I’m pleased with the results. But I want to make more.

One comment I loved on this black and white version was how ‘sophisticated’ it made something as simple as acorns look – and I agree, so I’m stealing that (squirreling it?) and calling this pattern ‘SOPHISTICATED ACORNS’:

' SOPHISTICATED ACORNS' surface pattern design, simple repeat

I also liked these alternate versions: the autumnal colours of SAGE and BRIGHT RED for different backgrounds, the faded look, the shiny MAHOGANY BROWN. It’s just a shame the colour bled through the non-enclosed spaces that were white #backtothedrawingboard

These are simple repeats using a ‘scatter’ technique, which is fine, but…

For the coloured acorns, I thought I’d get a bit fancy and try a half-drop repeat.

A bit more technical, I always get confused half-way through, but you can do so much more with a half-drop, and dare I say it, make even more sophisticated acorns:

'ACORNS' surface pattern design, half-drop repeat

It was OK plain, but then I added this orange background – which I’m calling ‘burnt sienna’ (great colour, amazing connotations).

I toned down the acorns and feel this combination really makes them ‘pop’. It feels the most autumnal, too.

'ACORNS' surface pattern design (burnt sienna), half-drop repeat

I love the way this pattern has a ‘rope’ effect, like banisters on the stairs.

I can see this working for thanksgiving or Christmas, but especially – and this is particularly sophisticated – in a squirrel’s pantry!

What do you think?

'ACORNS' surface pattern design (burnt sienna), half-drop repeat

I could have made the background a bit more detailed, rather than so plain, but that’s for another day; I’m not that fancy yet.

I’ll leave you with these lyrics from this song, which has a really lovely message

Be like the squirrel girl, be like the squirrel”, Little Acorns, The White Stripes

Posted on October 3, 2016

Finding inspiration: shapes, patterns & motifs

Last week I started a new course in pattern design (yes, I’m obsessed!), and the homework was to find simple shapes and motifs in the everyday things around you. Noticing the everyday things around you, really.

The idea was to get out and about, away from the computer, observing nature and the great outdoors in real life, sketching and photographing along the way.

Finding inspiration: wild flowers

Each day I excelled at finding the inspiration:

On walks around my town (cracks in the pavement, sunlight dappling a brick wall, fallen leaves)

In my garden (different shaped leaves and petals, holly, snail trails)

Even in the everyday objects of my home – the bristles of my washing up brush for example!

Finding inspiration: washing up brush

I’ve not yet had a chance to really delve into these inspirations in my sketchbook, save for a few quick studies.

This one below features the stems of a flower I managed to grow, but I’m not even sure what it is?

Finding inspiration: sketching flowers

It was the first time I opened this box of pencils and it felt…like the start of a new chapter in my creativity. That’s fitting for autumn isn’t it?

And as I head off on a week’s writing and art retreat at the Ted Hughes Arvon centre, Lumb Bank, I thought I’d document my ‘finds’ so far so I don’t lose momentum.

While I’m away I intend to spend a lot of time working in my sketchbook, and will also be creating a hand-made book, so all these inspirations will blend into the mix.

I even managed a quick visit to the Kibble Palace at Glasgow’s Botanic Gardens – isn’t this lady so wistful? I bet she has plenty of inspiration to share!

Finding inspiration at the Kibble Palace, Glasgow

The succulent garden was especially inspiring – all the gorgeous, perfect natural shapes.

Finding inspiration: succulents

And here’s my interpretation in watercolour:

Finding inspiration: succulent sketch

I loved that I noticed these patterns that perhaps I wouldn’t normally have stopped to photograph. The condensation particularly caught my attention, with the vibrant green of the grass behind the glass.


Finally, a bit of colour in these hydrangea petals as they transform into their autumn shades:

Finding inspiration: hydrangea

The holly leaves in my garden were so pristine and shiny, so I’ll definitely be sketching them. The heather has such interesting little flower tips too, a bit like the lavender I picked.


Now I can carry all these thoughts with me as I pack my selection of travelling art supplies.

Updates on my trip next week!

In the meantime, you might want to subscribe to my ‘inspiration’ newsletter. Check out last week’s mail-out all about autumn.

Posted on September 23, 2016

Cherry blossom joy inspired by Marie Kondo

This week I’ve been reading ‘Spark Joy: An Illustrated Guide to Tidying Up‘ by Marie Kondo, the sequel if you like, to ‘The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying’ (which incidently, I have yet to read.)

Cherry Blossom time & sparking joy with Marie Kondo

I’m late to the party on these books I know, and I’m also a bit of a hoarder; collecting bubble wrap and ‘nice’ empty boxes and ‘things-that-might-one-day-be-useful-for-that-amazing-project-I’ve-yet-to-start…’

I expected the book to be all about discarding as many possessions as possible, being ruthless with your sentimental ‘komono‘ items and keeping nothing if it wasn’t of the utmost practical use.

There was an element of that (the part about her getting rid of her vacuum cleaner because it didn’t spark joy was particularly amusing), but much more than getting rid of things, the focus was on what to keep, and most specifically, what to keep that sparks joy.

Does what it says on the cover. Good start.

But I didn’t really think I had that much to learn about all this.

I love tidying and reorganising things and feel like I’ve been on a mission for half my life to do just that.

But then that’s the problem too.

The point of the ‘KonMari Method‘ is that once you decide to keep only the things that spark joy and allocate them all a space in your home, there should never be a need to undertake a big ‘clear out’ ever again. A hefty claim when you consider the modern crisis of fast fashion, perk-me-up purchasing and the Western culture for accumulating possessions as status symbols.

And it turns out I had a lot to learn.

Cherry Blossom

This week I’ve KonMari-ed the clothes I keep in drawers – basically folded them into squares and rolled them up, and it was pretty joyful KonMari-ing the kitchen. I will never again be defeated/deflated/deafened by pans and oven trays falling from the cupboard.

And I’ve started using things I’d almost forgotten about.

A beautiful pen, a roller-ball perfume stick, hot pink lipstick, a heart-shaped casserole dish and some bright, colourful dresses that I’d never had ‘occasion’ to wear.

Use the things that spark joy!

I also discarded about 15 pens that didn’t work, didn’t write well or were just cheap promotional pens I’ve gathered over the years and kept for no reason except maybe ‘you can never have too many pens’. Except you can.

I’ve recycled manuals and papers and been able to part with things I’ve agonised over for years.

I’m not going to analyse the book in any further detail (and plenty of people already have), but I do want to share this anecdote that Marie Kondo gives in the book. I think it sums up the point of it all for me and I keep thinking of it because it’s such an uplifting story:

Not long ago, I went cherry blossom viewing with my family for the first time in fifteen years. We didn’t go anywhere special, just to a little park near my house. Despite the sudden notice, my mother had prepared a picnic lunch…but that was not all.

My mother opened another package to reveal a bottle of pink-hued amazake, a beverage made from sweet fermented rice, and small pink glasses with a cherry blossom pattern. When filled with the pink amazake, it looked like cherry blossoms were blooming in our glasses. ‘How beautiful!’

The blossoms I viewed with my family that day were the best I had ever seen. The glasses that my mother had chosen showed me the precious piece I had been missing.

Her take-out thought after this wonderful day with her family was: I want to live my life in such a way that it colours my things with memories.

I love that so much.

I want to live my life in such a way that it colours my things with memories

Cherry Blossom time & sparking joy with Marie Kondo

Marie Kondo also suggest some changes that might occur when you start to tidy:

  • You gain a little confidence

  • You start to believe in the future

  • Things begin to go more smoothly

  • The people you meet change

  • Unexpected things happen in a positive way

  • Change begins to accelerate

  • You begin to really enjoy your life

I don’t agree or disagree with these statements – I didn’t feel shy or disbelieving in the future before I read the book (or before I started this special process of tidying to spark joy), but I think for some people the act of tidying up can become a deep psychological process because it forces you to analyse how you really feel about each possession and also why you are keeping it.

One statement I do agree with comes near the end of the book:

Tidying is contagious.

Yes, yes it is!

Do you have a special ‘cherry blossom’ memory?

Posted on September 19, 2016

‘You Cut Me To The Quick’ ‘GREEN’ Collage

Through The Collage Club, of which I am an avid supporter (if sporadic contributor), I heard about the call out for GREEN themed collages.

I did a GREEN collage a few years ago, which my local council featured in their newsletter (I used elements of their printed newsletter – oh the irony), but this time I took it a step further.

It didn’t need to be ‘green’ in colour but you had to explain how the finished collage would meet the theme brief of GREEN.

In my head I saw a steep rainforest of green trees with dotted lines intersecting them, like a blueprint for destruction (a green print would be more apt here).

It sounds like a negative image, and indeed, the culling of trees and the destruction of natural habitats for endangered animals is not a happy subject, but it’s a subject I’m passionate about and having this image fired me up to create.

I started with a quick watercolour of simple triangular shapes representing trees, adding in pencil marks and patterns once the watercolour was dry.

Watercolour & collage forest

Next, I layered ripped papers, some featuring handwriting (like words of the law, like an agreement with nature?), to make a more cohesive forest.

I then photographed the page to manipulate digitally.

As I worked, more ideas came to me and I was inspired to layer a photograph of a glorious orange sunset over the forest.

I positioned it so the sun was visible and allowed the forest to show through. The thinking behind this was of ‘the sun coming down on the forest’ if it was set for destruction.

Mmm, still quite bleak. But it’s an important message because this stuff is really happening.

Sunset through trees, winter in ScotlandSunset through trees, winter in Scotland

Next, I started hacking into my beautiful, serene image with ‘digital scissors’, leaving empty spaces where the trees used to be.

This created jagged edges and sharp lines that ‘go against the grain’ of nature (like destruction), and I left them because they are the essence of my point, the prism of my view.

I still think the image is rather beautiful in a haphazard way, if a little…’busy’. But then destruction sites tend to be busy, don’t they?

Finally, I added a few pairs of scissors and crude broken lines marking out the areas to be cut, destroyed, taken out, burnt away.

'Cut Me to the Quick' collage

Effective? I called it ‘You Cut Me To The Quick‘.

Read more

Posted on September 9, 2016

How to stand out in surface pattern design

How can you stand out in surface pattern design?

It’s a big question, and one I’ve been pondering daily since my lovely friend Romana of The Creatory alerted me to this competition in UPPERCASE Magazine.

I’ve been talking a lot about patterns recently and how I’ve been sucked into the vortex of designing: it’s addictive and incredible and it doesn’t just start and end with one pattern.

It encompasses defining a palette, sourcing motifs, working to a theme or a trend or a brief or a style…

And that’s the crux of it. I feel too ‘fledgling’ to have a recognisable style.

This video featuring UPPERCASE Editor and Designer Janine Vangool, explains some key pointers as well as naming some of the different style footprints a designer might work to:

Big & bold, floral & chintzy, graphic, geometric, linear, minimalist, illustrative, cutesy, block colours, not scared of black…

Yet there are elements I love in all of these styles. I’m multi-passionate – what can I say? Here’s my 6 top-take-outs from the video:

How to stand out in Surface Pattern Design

I’m quite bold in my personal style and that filters through to the way I dress, the colours I’m drawn to and my choice of internal decor.

But I love minimalist geometric work too. And illustrative design. And I’m not scared of black: on me, on my walls, in pattern.

Black & White Leaf Repeating Pattern, Rebecca JohnstoneIn my mind I want to do something different; marry incongruous elements that juxtapose each other to stand out against the ditsy florals and the abstract colour blocks.

I want to draw on dark forces like folklore and The Brothers’ Grimm fairy tales to weave a story through my patterns and project my ‘inner world’ into the ‘outside world’. It’s a lot to consider.

UPPERCASE magazine markets itself as for ‘the creative and the curious’, and that’s definitely me. And it got me wondering:

Are creative people everywhere asking the same questions of themselves, over and over, trying to find their niche, their style, their oeuvre? Are they keeping themselves awake at night with their creative curiosity, just like me? I think the answer is ‘yes’.

There’s a lot of work to be done, and this new focus for my creativity has given me a lot to think about in discovering my design footprint and in doing so, discovering and revealing another layer of myself.

For now, I’ve been focusing on a perennial (yet seasonal) favourite: autumn leaves. I can’t believe the year has spun us round to September already, but as the leaves begin to fall, I’ll be documenting them through my patterns.

Sign up for monthly inspiration from Dainty Dora’s Inspiration Emporium. Check out the debut mail-out here.

Posted on September 1, 2016

PaisleyMake Festival: Fashion & Design Showcase

Yesterday I went ‘behind the scenes’ of Paisley Museum’s pattern archives as part of the PaisleyMake festival of creativity and design celebrations. For a student of textiles and a lover of all things pattern, it was catnip and Christmas come early. (Cue selfie with a loom!)

Rebecca Johnstone, Paisley Museum

As the Paisley2021 City of Culture UK bid gains momentum, the spotlight is on Scottish designers as they showcase their wares in Paisley Abbey for the PaisleyMake festival in partnership with Scotland Re:Designed.

As part of the showcase, experts from across the fashion and textile industry are speaking on topics such as innovation, collaboration and smart textiles. (Find out who and when.)

Being a local designer myself, I was delighted to get a sneak-peek, and was drawn to this colourful stand featuring designs and prints by Mairi Helena.

Scotland Re:Designed, PaisleyMake, Paisley Abbey

The hat and glove sets by Green Thomas lured me with their patterns, and the 100% lambswool scarves had me thinking: hello autumn accessories.

Green Thomas Hat and Gloves, Paisley MakeScotland Re:Designed, PaisleyMake, Paisley Abbey

Other designers selected to exhibit include: Barbra Kolasinski, Natasha Marshall, Rebecca Torres, Niki Fulton, Pea Cooper Millinery, Vonne Alley and Siobhan Mackenzie. (Full list plus links.)

The place to be is Paisley Abbey in the heart of the town, flanked by one of the many colourful lions for the Pride of Paisley summer art trail. 

A 'Pride of Paisley' lion outside Paisley Abbey

The striking Paisley-pattern weave on these decorated pillars create a really eye-catching entrance to the Abbey – thank Dyane Lanez of Tout Petit.

I love a bit of yarn-bombing but maybe this is weave-wrapping?

Decorated pillars at the entrance to Paisley Abbey

And while the focus is on modern innovations, and for many people tartan is the first thing that leaps to mind as the go-to Scottish textile, it’s hard to imagine today’s Paisley town-centre as a once-thriving textile hub, home to hand-weavers threading the intricate design of the now-infamous ‘floral teardrop‘ into shawls that were sold around the world.

Paisley Shawl collection, Paisley Museum Paisley Shawl collection, Paisley MuseumPaisley Pattern archive, Paisley Museum

Paisley Museum’s design archives proffer an inspirational legacy for a new generation of artisans and designers to reconnect with Paisley’s many treasures, perhaps re-working the ‘Paisley pattern’ or the ‘Paisley print’ for the modern era of fashion and textile design?

I intend to rise to this challenge and will be drawing (literally!) my inspiration from the early European and Indian influences, as well as key motifs from the Art Deco and Art Nouveau movements.

I look forward to featuring more of the archival pattern books that Dr Dan Coughlan, Curator of Textiles at Paisley Museum, was kind enough to share, but for now I’ll leave you with some more creative inspiration from the Scotland Re:Designed showcase – until 3rd September 2016.

Jewellery by Others Are at PaisleyMake festival

Rings by Others Are.

Gatekeeper Art by Lil Brookes

Intricate Gatekeeper Art by Lil Brookes.

PaisleyMake street signs, Paisley

NB: Although I was lucky enough to attend a local Blogger Preview to the collections at both Paisley Museum and the PaisleyMake showcase, this is not a sponsored post and all thoughts are my own.

Posted on August 20, 2016

Psychedelic Forest

I’ve been working a lot on digital pattern design recently, and part of that has meant manipulating my watercolour and acrylic art digitally.

It’s something I had never really thought of doing before, beyond the usual cropping and touching up of an image to post online.

But then…the patterns.

I present: ‘Psychedelic Forest’

Psychedelic Forest: a digital collageI painted the watercolour forest while chatting on the phone, pencilled over it and added a bit of collage. A bit of fun on a sunny evening. (It was a long conversation!)

Then I was working on some new patterns for the Make it in Design Summer School 2016, and accidentally filled the background of the scanned image. Well, that’s changed everything.

I’d buy it from myself if I could. I know you’re not meant to say that about your own work but I love the drama and the colour, the vibrant, vivid colour, and the naive, hand-drawn elements.

It’s the art print of my mind right now.

Psychedelic: “hallucinations and apparent expansion of consciousness” – exactly.

If it was a real place I’d go. I wonder what adventures I’d find in the ‘Psychedelic Forest‘?

Happy (inspirational) Saturday!

Posted on August 10, 2016

Designing the French Riviera S/S 2017

For the last week I’ve been obsessively designing patterns for the Make it in Design ‘Beginner’ Summer School. It’s been so much fun!

The brief was for simple, stylised designs for multiple applications across fashion and home.

The colour palette was provided as Pantone colour samples and I used these by colour matching them in Photoshop/Illustrator using the eyedropper tool (I haven’t worked out how to load Pantone palettes yet).

My first thoughts were of palm trees, ship’s wheels, sunsets and prawns. A heady mix for the French Riviera jetset!?

Palm Tree Line Drawing

I’d forgotten how tricksy Illustrator is. Why can’t you move between artboards and still have the colour selected? #firstworldissues

I managed to learn a few new Illustrator skills in the process. Like adding gradients (a key element in the design brief), and isolating different elements of an image-traced live-paint group to change colours.

After playing about with the below design for a while, I couldn’t decide which version I liked best – thoughts?


Then I had to remind myself: gradients don’t repeat, but they still look nice for a single placement.

I can see this design on a beach towel, face cloth, napkins, plates (especially picnic plates!), t-shirts, a beach bag. Loads of possibilities.

The limited palette really helped me to focus on the designs, and re-use colours where I would normally have gone for more of an obvious impact. I think it’s proven to me how much cohesion it creates too. That’s particularly true with the pink ship’s wheel design below. I created it in another colour way (not shown here), and had fun playing with scale.

Here’s a few of my other favourite designs for this brief:

French Riviera SS17 'Graph Prawn' surface pattern designFrench Riviera SS17 'Leaping Prawn - with Gradient' surface pattern designFrench Riviera SS17 'Pink Ship's Wheel' surface pattern designPrintFrench Riviera SS17 'Leaping Prawn' surface pattern designFrench Riviera SS17 'Sunset Palm' surface pattern design

Most of the designs are simple grid repeat vector patterns, but the ‘Graph Prawn’ is a single ‘placement’ design. He’s cheeky isn’t he?

Which one is your favourite? I’d love to know.

***Update, Update 15.08.16***

So excited to find out that I WON one of the ’20 ways to draw…‘ books for sharing my pattern-progress on Instagram. Taking this as a sign to focus more on my patterns and design work!

Posted on July 26, 2016


My last collage was for the theme of ‘YELLOW‘, then I missed a few. July’s theme is ‘STRIPES‘.

Geometrics are definite, daring and inspiring.

When I think ‘stripes’ the image in my head is of a stereotypical French person in a long-sleeved Breton top. With onions. I also think of zebras.

Keeping it strictly fashion, the centrepiece of this collage is an illustration by René Gruau. J’adore.

COLLAGE CLUB 'Stripes' collage, July 2016I think she’s chic, sophisticated and up to date on the latest trends, stripes or otherwise. And she’s a jet-setter, oh yeah.

Beirut, Buenos Aires, Shanghai, Hollywood in Cambodia…

Everything else is just, you know? BLAH.

COLLAGE CLUB 'Stripes' collage, July 2016There’s another page to this month’s collage too.

I was going to create the male counterpart to René‘s exotic, striped lady. But I never got that far.

I’m including him anyway because…striped shirt and shades.

COLLAGE CLUB 'Stripes' collage, July 2016Find out more and join The Collage Club – creative prizes are up for grabs every month.

PS. Vertical City – does that exist? I think I’d like to visit, being tall and all.

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